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WHAT & WHERE IS KULAFUMBI?

1724670-982768-thumbnail.jpg 'Kulafumbi' is our family home in Kenya, East Africa. 'Kulafumbi' is a play on the Kiswahili words "kula vumbi", which mean "eat dust", because it was so hot and dusty building our house in this remote, wild, wonderful place. Kulafumbi borders the Tsavo National Park - with no fences between us and the Park, the wildlife comes and goes of its own free will and treats our land as its own, which is exactly how we like it. In turn, we provide a protected area for the wild animals to do as they please. This protected area also creates an important buffer for the river, which forms the boundary between us and the park.
House & Land - more info
My Family & I - more info

ON-GOING SPECIES COUNT

1829439-992202-thumbnail.jpg Look how many species of animals & birds we've spotted to date at Kulafumbi:

MAMMALS: 43+
REPTILES &
AMPHIBIANS: 18+++

BIRDS: 199+
INSECTS: Too many to count

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SAFARI SANCTUARY: the conservation game

The fabulous new Facebook game that supports conservation efforts in Africa!

Build your own wildlife orphanage in Africa's wilderness - adopt sick or lonely orphaned baby elephants, rhino, meerkats, buffalo and many other animals - nurse them back to health and give them a second chance in life!

This is not a zoo game! Once your animals are big and strong enough to look after themselves, release them back into the wild where they belong! Fly on animal rescue missions in your helicopter, chase evil poachers, remove nasty animal traps, enjoy incredible graphics, 3D dynamic, interactive animals and the real sounds of the African savannah. This game looks like Africa, feels like Africa, in fact it virtually IS Africa! There's not another game quite like this one, a trans-continental creation developed between the African wilderness and a digital games studio in UK.

PLAY NOW! or if you prefer, LEARN MORE ABOUT THE GAME, WHAT INSPIRED ITS CREATION AND WHICH CONSERVATION CHARITIES BENEFIT FROM IT.

Kenyans for Wildlife

KENYANS FOR WILDLIFE
is a dynamic, interesting Facebook group which discusses wildlife issues in Kenya and is having an incredible effect on conservation in this country. You don't have to be Kenyan - this group is open to everyone. If you care about conservation in Africa, please do join. 

JOIN NOW - KENYANS FOR WILDLIFE.

PEOPLE LIKE US

"We are the music-makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams,
Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
And sitting by desolate streams;
World-losers and world-forsakers,
On whom the pale moon gleams:
Yet we are the movers and shakers
Of the world for ever, it seems..."

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« 18th November 2007 | Main | 16th November 2007 »
Wednesday
Nov212007

17th November 2007

Today was a “plant day”. There was sporadic rain, but not much. Nonetheless, the damp conditions have really got all the plants going. The beautiful Bauhinia are starting to flower, the Commiphora have all unfurled their leaf buds, and now are blooming with bright green foliage (dramatic and bright against the black storm clouds), and the Acacias are blossoming too.

The Fig Tree shoots in their make-shift pots on the balcony are in danger of being overwhelmed by all the other plants and flowers which have self-seeded in the soil alongside them – including the large white datura flower and some other, more delicate white blossoms. There is a new “asparagus plant” growing next to the first one, in the lily flowerbed. The grasses in the balcony flowerbeds are flowering too. In fact, it’s all happening all of a sudden!

There is a strange succulent-like creeper than seems to cover trees from head to toe – there’s one tree right by our house which is totally engulfed – and it seems to sending out new shoots everywhere I look.

Other species of flowers, which we saw earlier in our “garden” near the house where we had kick-started things by watering, are now starting to flower further afield, like the thunbergia guerkeana creeper with its beautiful white flower that opens at night.

Under the larger trees and bushes, there are literally millions of tiny new shoots bursting out of the soil and making a bid for life. The Peaceful Place is a carpet of green now, under the big trees. The Dik-Diks are making the most of it, busily munching away at the new shoots.

But bad news accompanies all this rebirth and regeneration: the Egyptian Goose family turned up again – with only five goslings. One has succumbed to a predator. Life is not easy here, even for a large gosling with two aggressive, noisy parents and a bunch of siblings. In terms of survival of the species, though, they’re still doing well – sad as it is on an emotional level, “five out of seven ain’t bad”.

PM

The weaver nest is gone too – the one on the reed island in the middle of the river. Tonight at 8pm, just as we had finished dinner, the river came down in a mighty roaring flood. We stood and watched in awe (how mighty nature can be, and how frightening is the force of a big river when it comes down in flood – if it caught you unawares, you could do nothing against it). The water was red and angry, carrying with it sticks and branches and debris from further upstream. The weaver wavered for a while, then bobbed on the surface for a while as the water reached it, and then it succumbed altogether – all that hard work wasted. The reed islands themselves had a hard time withstanding the force of the water, and were almost completely flattened. Only the weaver nests in the very top of the reeds stood any chance at all of getting through the night. Even the crocodiles sought refuge in calmer backwaters on the edge of the river.

When we finally retired to bed, the river was still high and roaring.

[PHOTOS COMING SOON FOR THIS ENTRY. IN THE MEANTIME, CHECK OUT MY OTHER PHOTO STORIES.]

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