KULAFUMBI ON FACEBOOK

Please join the KULAFUMBI FACEBOOK PAGE for quick updates, extra photos & news snippets...

Also now on TWITTER @TsavoTanya...

WHAT & WHERE IS KULAFUMBI?

1724670-982768-thumbnail.jpg 'Kulafumbi' is our family home in Kenya, East Africa. 'Kulafumbi' is a play on the Kiswahili words "kula vumbi", which mean "eat dust", because it was so hot and dusty building our house in this remote, wild, wonderful place. Kulafumbi borders the Tsavo National Park - with no fences between us and the Park, the wildlife comes and goes of its own free will and treats our land as its own, which is exactly how we like it. In turn, we provide a protected area for the wild animals to do as they please. This protected area also creates an important buffer for the river, which forms the boundary between us and the park.
House & Land - more info
My Family & I - more info

ON-GOING SPECIES COUNT

1829439-992202-thumbnail.jpg Look how many species of animals & birds we've spotted to date at Kulafumbi:

MAMMALS: 43+
REPTILES &
AMPHIBIANS: 18+++

BIRDS: 199+
INSECTS: Too many to count

SEARCH THIS SITE
Kenyans for Wildlife

KENYANS FOR WILDLIFE
is a dynamic, interesting Facebook group which discusses wildlife issues in Kenya and is having an incredible effect on conservation in this country. You don't have to be Kenyan - this group is open to everyone. If you care about conservation in Africa, please do join. 

JOIN NOW - KENYANS FOR WILDLIFE.

PEOPLE LIKE US

"We are the music-makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams,
Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
And sitting by desolate streams;
World-losers and world-forsakers,
On whom the pale moon gleams:
Yet we are the movers and shakers
Of the world for ever, it seems..."

1722042-921087-thumbnail.jpg

BLOGGING FAMILY

Nature Blog Network

Expat Women—Helping Women Living Overseas

Bloglisting.net - The internets fastest growing blog directory

Photography Directory by PhotoLinks

Add to Technorati Favorites

Blog Flux Directory

Blog Directory - Blogged

Digg!

Bloggapedia, Blog Directory - Find It!

Blogarama - The Blog Directory

Photo Blogs - Blog Catalog Blog Directory

Tales from Kulafumbi: Diary of a Nature Lover; Tsavo, Kenya, East Africa -  Journal at Blogged

BOOKMARK

AddThis Social Bookmark Button AddThis Feed Button

Powered by Squarespace
« 11th November 2007 | Main | 5th November 2007 »
Wednesday
Nov212007

10th November 2007

[PHOTOS FOR THIS ENTRY ARE COMING SOON...IN THE MEANTIME, WHY NOT CHECK OUT THE PHOTO STORIES I'VE ALREADY CREATED?]

We returned yesterday evening from a trip to the hustle and bustle of Nairobi, where the Jacaranda trees are all in flower – thousands of lilac blossoms like you can’t imagine. All the way to Nairobi, there was no trace of rain – the country is dry and parched. No wonder the river is so low, for its source is up near Nairobi, and when the water level rises here, it is because of rain falling upcountry, not right here.

A young Gymnogene was on the islands again, hunting for frogs. The Plovers were not happy about it, and the young eagle was bombed relentlessly. The big Monitor Lizard passed by too, but they didn’t seem too concerned about him (which is strange, as Monitor Lizards certainly eat Plover eggs, and therefore would not normally be welcome, whether there is a nest or not.)

You can tell from this dried out piece of Hippo dung, that the poor beasts do not have much left to feed on, just course dry grass.

Late in the evening, we took a walk in through the thick bush to a huge Baobab tree at the far end of the property. What an ancient giant it is, with wonderfully gnarled bark where elephants have gouged into the tree in generations gone by. In a dry place like this, where there is not enough water to allow it to grow quickly, the tree is probably hundreds of years old. (Baobabs have been known to grow faster, but only in areas of high rainfall or artificial watering. It is estimated that the oldest Baobabs are a couple of thousand years old, but they are very difficult to age because their soft, pulpy wood does not grow in rings.) The massive tree is a home to all sorts of smaller organisms: there is a busy beehive in one of its hollow branches, and many large spider webs (some growing over empty obsolete honey combs). You can see where honey hunters in years of old have driven in wooden stakes to allow them to climb the tree and retrieve their booty. The light and the clouds were gorgeous as the sun sank lower in the sky, and even the dead Baobab flowers with their rich dark red colour, were beautiful.

As we headed homewards, and rejoined the dust track that meanders back to the house, we came across a young Kudu bull. Even though the light was dull by then, I took a photo nonetheless, for the Kudu is one of my favourite antelope.

[PHOTOS FOR THIS ENTRY ARE COMING SOON...IN THE MEANTIME, WHY NOT CHECK OUT THE PHOTO STORIES I'VE ALREADY CREATED?]

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>